New Lives for Old: The Story of Britain’s Child Migrants

By: Roger Kershaw

Price: $34.95

Quantity: 2 available

Book Details: The National Archives [United Kingdom]


More Description

Over 100,000 children were sent across the seas to Canada between 1869 and the late 1930s. Thousands of others were dispatched to Australia as well as to New Zealand, South Africa and Rhodesia up to and even after the Second World War. These young migrants came from charitable organizations or children's homes, and were sent to find a better life as agricultural workers and servants, mechanics and skilled artisans. They were the superfluous thousands of Britain's cities, including workhouse paupers, reformatory inmates, children from industrial schools and those rescued from slums and the streets. Ranging from five- and six-year olds to teenagers, all were thrust into an alien world from which there was little chance of return. This compelling book tells the story of this controversial practice, from the accounts of those involved and the authentic records of the time. It traces the people behind the migrations exploring their beliefs and aspirations for the children in their care. It considers the roles that different organizations (including the Childrens Society, National Childrens Home and the Catholic Nugent Society Care Homes) played as well as the shipping lines that carried the children from Liverpool, Glasgow and other ports and the centers that received them overseas. Most importantly, it describes the experiences of the children themselves. Clear-sighted and objective, this is a gripping tale of the good, the bad and the ugly based on original documents from The National Archives and other sources. Above all, it celebrates those who welcomed the migrants and the children who managed, against all the odds, to adapt to their new lives.

Title: New Lives for Old: The Story of Britain’s Child Migrants

Author: Roger Kershaw

Categories: Great Britain,

Publisher: The National Archives [United Kingdom]:

ISBN Number: 1905615175

ISBN Number 13: 9781905615179

Binding: Hardcover

Book Details: The National Archives [United Kingdom]

Seller ID: 615179

Description: Over 100,000 children were sent across the seas to Canada between 1869 and the late 1930s. Thousands of others were dispatched to Australia – as well as to New Zealand, South Africa and Rhodesia – up to and even after the Second World War. These young migrants came from charitable organizations or children’s homes, and were sent to find a better life as agricultural workers and servants, mechanics and skilled artisans. They were the ‘superfluous thousands’ of Britain’s cities, including workhouse paupers, reformatory inmates, children from industrial schools and those rescued from slums and the streets. Ranging from five- and six-year olds to teenagers, all were thrust into an alien world from which there was little chance of return.

This compelling book tells the story of this controversial practice, from the accounts of those involved and the authentic records of the time. It traces the people behind the migrations – exploring their beliefs and aspirations for the children in their care. It considers the roles that different organizations (including the Children’s Society, National Children’s Home and the Catholic Nugent Society Care Homes) played as well as the shipping lines that carried the children from Liverpool, Glasgow and other ports and the centers that received them overseas. Most importantly, it describes the experiences of the children themselves. Clear-sighted and objective, this is a gripping tale of the good, the bad and the ugly based on original documents from The National Archives and other sources. Above all, it celebrates those who welcomed the migrants and the children who managed, against all the odds, to adapt to their new lives.

About Author
Roger Kershaw is Manager of the Modern Records Information Service at The National Archives. He is the co-author of Immigrants and Aliens: a guide to sources on UK immigration and citizenship.
The National Archives [United Kingdom]