A Journey to Ohio in 1810


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In his introduction, Jay Gitlin, a professor of history at Yale University, says more about Margaret Van Horn Dwight's wagon journey in 1810 from New Haven, Connecticut, to Warren, Ohio, where she would find a husband, bear thirteen children, and die in middle-age.

Title: A Journey to Ohio in 1810

Author: Margaret Van Horn Dwight Edited with and introduction by Max Farrand; introduction to the Bison book Edition by Jay Gitlin

Illustrator: Reg. Price: $10.95

Categories: Ohio,

Publisher: University of Nebraska Press: 1991

ISBN Number: 0-8032-6589-1

ISBN Number 13: 9780803265899

Binding: paperback

Book Details: 68 pages, Map, paperback, University of Nebraska Press

Seller ID: 265891

Description: In his introduction, Jay Gitlin, a professor of history at Yale University, says more about Margaret Van Horn Dwight's wagon journey in 1810 from New Haven, Connecticut, to Warren, Ohio, where she would find a husband, bear thirteen children, and die in middle-age.

Reviews
"Here is a valuable and rare document providing a woman's perspective on a western passage that has received little attention from historians. Margaret Dwight's journal gives us a first-hand account that goes way beyond the usual reckoning of miles traveled and notes on the weather. She provides an intimate view of the people on the trail. From her observations we get a sense of the back-country settlements of Pennsylvania and Ohio in 1810, the language, the sounds, and even the smells of this early American West. Her journal is full of witty and occasionally sarcastic remarks. For all her prejudices and self-admitted pride, she emerges as a likeable person and valuable guide."—Jay Gitlin, in his introduction.

"[The writer shows] shrewd humor and delightful lack of self-consciousness. . . . A valuable addition to the social history of the period and region."—American Historical Review.

"[Margaret Dwight's] diary is a work of extraordinary charm and interest, for she possessed a most vivacious mind, was both observant and imaginative, and had moreover a quite considerable literary gift."—Spectator.