The Roots of African-American Identity: Memory and History in Antebellum Free Communities

By: Elizabeth Bethel

Price: $31.95

Quantity: 5 available


More Description

Spanning the eight decades between the American Revolution and the Civil War, The Roots of African-American Identity focuses on the lives of African Americans in the nominally free northern and western states. This book explores how a group of marginalized people crafted a uniquely New World ethnic identity that informed popular African American historical consciousness. Elizabeth Rauh Bethel examines the way in which that consciousness fueled collective efforts to claim and live a promised but undelivered democratic freedom, helping readers to understand how African Americans reformulated and perceived their collective past. Bethel also reveals how this vision of freedom and historical consciousness shaped African American participation in the Reconstruction, formed the spiritual and ideological foundation for the modern Pan-African movement, and provided the historical legacy for the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Comprehensive and engaging, The Roots of African-American Identity is an absorbing account of an often overlooked part of American history.

Title: The Roots of African-American Identity: Memory and History in Antebellum Free Communities

Author: Elizabeth Bethel

Illustrator: Reg. Price: $31.95

Categories: African American,

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan: 1999

ISBN Number: 0-312-21836-2

ISBN Number 13: 9780312218362

Binding: paperback

Book Details: 256 pages, paperback, Palgrave Macmillan

Seller ID: 218362

Description: Spanning the eight decades between the American Revolution and the Civil War, The Roots of African-American Identity focuses on the lives of African Americans in the nominally free northern and western states. This book explores how a group of marginalized people crafted a uniquely New World ethnic identity that informed popular African American historical consciousness. Elizabeth Rauh Bethel examines the way in which that consciousness fueled collective efforts to claim and live a promised but undelivered democratic freedom, helping readers to understand how African Americans reformulated and perceived their collective past. Bethel also reveals how this vision of freedom and historical consciousness shaped African American participation in the Reconstruction, formed the spiritual and ideological foundation for the modern Pan-African movement, and provided the historical legacy for the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Comprehensive and engaging, The Roots of African-American Identity is an absorbing account of an often overlooked part of American history.

About Author
Elizabeth Rauh Bethel is Professor of Sociology at Lander University and author of Promised Land: A Century of Life in a Negro Community and AIDS: Readings on a Global Crisis.

Reviews
“Bethel provides us with a very insightful study of the black experience in America.” —The Washington Times

“Highly recommended for collections on the pre-Civil War United States or African Americans.” —Library Journal

Table of Contents
Preface
Prologue: The Revolution Remembered: The Fifth of March, 1858
Part I: Fashioning a Moral Community, 1775-1800
"In the Bowels of a Free and Christian Country": Living in the Revolutionary Era
"Sons and Daughters of Distress": A Theology of Liberation
Part II: Environments of Memory, 1800-1835
From Laws and Revolutions, Freedom Lieux
Africa Envisioned, Africa Found
Moral Community, Ethnic Identity, and Political Action
Part III: History and the Politics of Memory, 1835-1860
Haiti, Canada, and a Pan-African Vision
Biography, Narrative, and Memory: The Construction of a Popular Historical Consciousness
Epilogue: Emancipation, Reconstruction, and Empire-Building
Notes
Index