Alabama - A History

By: Virginia Van der Veer Hamilton

Price: $11.00

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Pause for a moment before a gallery of fading portraits, and you will sense the beginnings of Alabama's troubled history--homespun pioneers gripped by "Alabama fever," chained and manacled black people quietly awaiting a slave trader's order to move on, newly rich planters and iron barons holding tightly to the reins of power. You will also be caught in the tangled web of the South's past.

Title: Alabama - A History

Author: Virginia Van der Veer Hamilton

Illustrator: Reg. Price: $11.00

Categories: Alabama,

Publisher: W. W. Norton: 1984

ISBN Number: 0-393-30172-9

ISBN Number 13: 9780393301724

Binding: paperback

Book Details: 192 pages, 5 1/2 x 8, paperback, W. W. Norton

Seller ID: 301729

Description: With a Historical Guide perpared by the editors of the American Association for State and Local History
Pause for a moment before a gallery of fading portraits, and you will sense the beginnings of Alabama's troubled history-homespun pioneers gripped by "Alabama fever," chained and manacled black people quietly awaiting a slave trader's order to move on, newly rich planters and iron barons holding tightly to the reins of power. You will also be caught in the tangled web of the South's past. It is a story, believes author Virginia V. Hamilton, that bears scrutiny by Alabamians and outsiders alike if they would better understand the present.
"Got along very badly today . . . roads rough and muddy," wrote an early migrant who could have spoken for thousands of white families bound for dogtrot cabins in the Alabama wilderness. Descendents of those pioneers in buckskin and liney-woolsey have been its most unchanging residents, but not its most admired. For a century, many white Alabamians schooled themselved in the plantation myth of stately mansions and costumed Confederates, of "Ma and Pa's" children masquerading as bluebloods and fondly recalling halcyon days that most had never shared.
The blacks watched it all, "through a glass darkly," at first, but later "face to face." Chattels to a master class for much of their history here, Alabama blacks finally threw off the yoke in civil-rights struggles that gave Selma, Montgomery, and Birmingham new meaning for the nation. Their fight made all Americans re-examine an unpleasant side of our national character. Today, while blacks and white still remember those old portraits and the past they represent, they feel new pride in a changing Alabama that has made great progress toward racial justice and economic opportunity for all its citizens.

About Author
Virginia Van der Veer Hamilton, well known for her writings on Alabama history, is professor of history and chair of the history department at the University of Alabama in Birmingham.