Hungarians in Michigan

By: Éva V. Huseby-Darvas.

Price: $11.95

Quantity: 5 available


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In Hungarians in Michigan, Eva V. Huseby-Darvas examines six distinct migrant streams that contributed to the formation of Michigan's Hungarian communities. From early rural immigrants, who hoped to save enough to return home to a life of ease, to urban, post-Iron Curtain immigrants trying to build new lives in the United States, Hungarians have left their mark on Michigan's history. Although Hungarians settled throughout the state, the locus of the Hungarian community was the village of Delray, now part of the city of Detroit. By linking the development and decline of Delray with other Hungarian communities in Michigan and across the Detroit River in Windsor, Huseby-Darvas draws a dynamic picture of cultural retention and change among diverse Hungarian migrants. Foods, holidays, festivals, church socials, and similar events help to maintain and perpetuate a culture that is neither Hungarian nor American, but a specific Michigan-style American Hungarian.

Title: Hungarians in Michigan

Author: Éva V. Huseby-Darvas.

Illustrator: Reg. Price: $11.95

Categories: Michigan,

Publisher: Michigan State University Press: c2002

ISBN Number: 0870136445

ISBN Number 13: 9780870136443

Binding: paperback

Book Details: 80 pages, 5 1/2 x 8 1/2, Photos, notes, index, maps, illus., paperback, Michigan State University Press

Seller ID: 136445

Description: In Hungarians in Michigan, Éva V. Huseby-Darvas examines six distinct migrant streams that contributed to the formation of Michigan's Hungarian communities. From early rural immigrants, who hoped to save enough to return home to a life of ease, to urban, post-Iron Curtain immigrants trying to build new lives in the United States, Hungarians have left their mark on Michigan's history. Although Hungarians settled throughout the state, the locus of the Hungarian community was the village of Delray, now part of the city of Detroit. By linking the development and decline of Delray with other Hungarian communities in Michigan and across the Detroit River in Windsor, Huseby-Darvas draws a dynamic picture of cultural retention and change among diverse Hungarian migrants. Foods, holidays, festivals, church socials, and similar events help to maintain and perpetuate a culture that is neither Hungarian nor American, but a specific Michigan-style American Hungarian.

About Author
Éva V. Huseby-Darvas is an anthropologist and teaches at the University of Michigan, Dearborn.