Doctoring the South: Southern Physicians and Everyday Medicine in the Mid-Nineteenth Century

By: Steven M. Stowe.

Price: $45.00

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Offering a new perspective on medical progress in the nineteenth century, Steven M. Stowe provides an in-depth study of the midcentury culture of everyday medicine in the South. Reading deeply in the personal letters, daybooks, diaries, bedside notes, and published writings of doctors, Stowe illuminates an entire world of sickness and remedy, suffering and hope, and the deep ties between medicine and regional culture.

In a distinct American region where climate, race and slavery, and assumptions about "southernness" profoundly shaped illness and healing in the lives of ordinary people, Stowe argues that southern doctors inhabited a world of skills, medicines, and ideas about sickness that allowed them to play moral, as well as practical, roles in their communities. Looking closely at medical education, bedside encounters, and medicine's larger social aims, he describes a "country orthodoxy" of local, social medical practice that highly valued the "art" of medicine. While not modern in the sense of laboratory science a century later, this country orthodoxy was in its own way modern, Stowe argues, providing a style of caregiving deeply rooted in individual experience, moral values, and a consciousness of place and time.

Title: Doctoring the South: Southern Physicians and Everyday Medicine in the Mid-Nineteenth Century

Author: Steven M. Stowe.

Illustrator: Reg. Price: $45.00

Categories: Health, Medicine, & Disease,

Publisher: University of North Carolina Press: 2004

ISBN Number: 0807828858

ISBN Number 13: 9780807828854

Binding: hardback

Book Details: 392 pages, 6 x 9 1/4, notes, bibl., index, hardback, University of North Carolina Press

Seller ID: 828858

Description: Offering a new perspective on medical progress in the nineteenth century, Steven M. Stowe provides an in-depth study of the midcentury culture of everyday medicine in the South. Reading deeply in the personal letters, daybooks, diaries, bedside notes, and published writings of doctors, Stowe illuminates an entire world of sickness and remedy, suffering and hope, and the deep ties between medicine and regional culture.
In a distinct American region where climate, race and slavery, and assumptions about "southernness" profoundly shaped illness and healing in the lives of ordinary people, Stowe argues that southern doctors inhabited a world of skills, medicines, and ideas about sickness that allowed them to play moral, as well as practical, roles in their communities. Looking closely at medical education, bedside encounters, and medicine's larger social aims, he describes a "country orthodoxy" of local, social medical practice that highly valued the "art" of medicine. While not modern in the sense of laboratory science a century later, this country orthodoxy was in its own way modern, Stowe argues, providing a style of caregiving deeply rooted in individual experience, moral values, and a consciousness of place and time.

About Author
Steven M. Stowe is professor of history at Indiana University, Bloomington. He is author of Intimacy and Power in the Old South: Ritual in the Lives of the Planters and editor of A Southern Practice: The Diary and Autobiography of Charles A. Hentz, M.D.

Reviews
"A richly evocative reconstruction of medicine and medical practice. Stowe contrasts a traditional, community-oriented reality with the more conventional narrative of elite-oriented progress. An important contribution to American cultural history."--Charles E. Rosenberg, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University

"Stowe thoughtfully and sensitively takes readers through nineteenth-century physicians' careers from medical school onward as seen from the physicians' perspective. He analyzes every aspect of their careers with particular emphasis on the relationships between physicians and the communities in which they practiced and between physicians and their individual patients."--Todd Savitt, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University

Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Physicians, Everyday Medicine, and the Country Orthodox Style
Sickness and Health in a Southern Place
Physicians: a Mid-Nineteenth-Century Profile
Part I. Choosing Medicine
Chapter 1. Men, Schools, and Careers
Family, Intellect, and the Manly Choice
Medical Schools and Reform: Stretching Orthodoxy
The Porous School: Apprenticeship
The Porous School: City Life and a Man's World
Chapter 2. The Science of All Life
Lectures: Synthesis and Practice
Clinics: Foreign Bodies and Appended Charity
Anatomy: Opened Bodies and the Moral Urge
The Medical Thesis: Enlightenments
Chapter 3. Starting Out
New Degree, Fresh Doubts
Calculation for Survival
The Community Chooses Its Own
First Patients, "Monster" Disease, and "Inward Satisfaction"
Part II. Doing Medicine
Chapter 4. Livelihood
Logging Patients, Seeing Race
Self-Interest and Moral Judgment
Health Talk across the Racial Divide
Rounds
Livelihood, Subjectivity, and the Country Orthodox Style
Chapter 5. Bedside
Summoned to the Social Bedside
Seeing Bodies: The Physical and the Social
Changing Bodies: "Experience" and the Charm of Drugs
Borrowing, Experimenting, and Violence
The Shadow of Bedside Practice
Part III. Making Medicine
Chapter 6. The Lives of Others
Co-attendance and Conflict
Writing Orthodoxy at the Bedside
John Knox: Effacing Pain
Charles Hentz: Making Case-time
Courtney Clark: Looking for Connections
Chapter 7. Landscape, Race, and Faith
Landscapes of Knowledge
Slavery and Race
Faith: Knowing What "Passeth Understanding"
Chapter 8. Witnessing
Case Narratives: Orthodoxy's Stories
Dr. Patteson: Technique and Transcendence
Dr. Dowler: Scientist and Community
Dr. Yandell: The Eclipse of the Personal
Dr. Bassett: The Eclipse of the Professional
Epilogue: The Civil War and the Persistence of the Country Orthodox Style
Notes
Bibliography
Index