Highland Heritage: Scottish Americans in the American South

By: Celeste Ray.

Price: $21.95

Quantity: 5 available


More Description

Each year, tens of thousands of people flock to Grandfather Mountain, North Carolina, and to more than two hundred other locations across the country to attend Scottish Highland Games and Gatherings. There, kilt-wearing participants compete in athletics, Highland dancing, and bagpiping, while others join clan societies in celebration of a Scottish heritage. As Celeste Ray notes, however, the Scottish affiliation that Americans claim today is a Highland Gaelic identity that did not come to characterize that nation until long after the ancestors of many Scottish Americans had left Scotland.

Ray explores how Highland Scottish themes and lore merge with southern regional myths and identities to produce a unique style of commemoration and a complex sense of identity for Scottish Americans in the South. Blending the objectivity of the anthropologist with respect for the people she studies, she asks how and why we use memories of our ancestral pasts to provide a sense of identity and community in the present. In so doing, she offers an original and insightful examination of what it means to be Scottish in America.

Title: Highland Heritage: Scottish Americans in the American South

Author: Celeste Ray.

Illustrator: Reg. Price: $21.95

Categories: Scottish, Southern States,

Publisher: University of North Carolina Press: c2001

ISBN Number: 0807849138

ISBN Number 13: 9780807849132

Binding: paperback

Book Details: 280 pages, 5 3/4 x 9 1/4, 35 illus., 4 maps, 1 fig., append., glossary, notes, bibl., index , paperback, University of North Carolina Press

Seller ID: 849138

Description: Each year, tens of thousands of people flock to Grandfather Mountain, North Carolina, and to more than two hundred other locations across the country to attend Scottish Highland Games and Gatherings. There, kilt-wearing participants compete in athletics, Highland dancing, and bagpiping, while others join clan societies in celebration of a Scottish heritage. As Celeste Ray notes, however, the Scottish affiliation that Americans claim today is a Highland Gaelic identity that did not come to characterize that nation until long after the ancestors of many Scottish Americans had left Scotland.
Ray explores how Highland Scottish themes and lore merge with southern regional myths and identities to produce a unique style of commemoration and a complex sense of identity for Scottish Americans in the South. Blending the objectivity of the anthropologist with respect for the people she studies, she asks how and why we use memories of our ancestral pasts to provide a sense of identity and community in the present. In so doing, she offers an original and insightful examination of what it means to be Scottish in America.

About Author
Celeste Ray is assistant professor of anthropology at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee.

Reviews
"[A] combination of resource compendium, exhaustively detailed anthropological study and astute cultural criticism. Extensive research, clear prose and respect for her subjects will win this authoritative work favor among Scottish American enthusiasts and academics alike."--Publishers Weekly

"[Ray] recreates in detail the annual Highland games and gathering at Grandfather Mountain, N.C., for those of us who don't know our sporrans from our claymores. Hint: you might be cleaved in two with the second if you insult a Scotsman for wearing the first."--A Nota Bene selection of The Chronicle of Higher Education

"Essential reading for anyone interested in the transnational dimensions of Scottishness and the increasingly voluntary nature of cultural identity. Highly recommended."--Scottish Affairs

"It is hard to imagine a more comprehensive account of what has gone on in the Scottish American heritage community in recent decades. . . . [Ray] has a sound grasp of Scottish history, and of the actual history of the Highland Scots in Carolina. . . . Fascinating."--Journal of American Studies

"The strong pull of the homeland has manifested itself in a surprising number of American southerners. Ray's scholarly and readable examination of that pull offers insight into this fascinating minority group. Ray focuses upon North Carolina's Cape Fear settlement . . . . But she also extends her study to all of the southern states to demonstrate the pride of those whose connection to Scotland goes deep. . . . Just as fascinating as her scholarship are the delightful additions to the book. Numerous photos . . . show how a number of 'ancient' traditions are preserved. If you want to know what they wear under those kilts, this is the text for you."--Bloomsbury Review

"[This book] should be of great interest to historians in general as an illustration of the creative ways in which history is interpreted and taught outside academia. It should be of particular interest to students of Appalachia."--Journal of Appalachian Studies

"A thoughtful, investigative publication, Highland Heritage will interest both American and Scottish readers."--Scots Magazine

"Examines the nature of heritage and the ways in which people reclaim and change a 'past' in order to connect with forebears as well as others in the present. . . . Anthropologists, ethnographers, and students of Southern studies will find Ray's work valuable."--Choice

"Ray, attracted by the persistence of ethnic identity that links Scotland with North Carolina, offers a fascinating portrayal of the Scottish American manifestation of this heritage movement. . . . Richly informative about the power of heritage in postmodern society. . . . Readers interested in the creation and power of heritage, whether Scottish or not, will find this a stimulating book."--Journal of Southern History

"Ray has produced a fascinating account of a comparatively modern (post WWII) movement amongst Scottish Americans to construct a heritage. . . . As a textbook, this would be a thought-provoking and enjoyable addition to local history, oral history, and ethnic history syllabi, as well as those in anthropology and sociology."--H-Net Book Review

"Celeste Ray's sensitive, thorough research examines two centuries of history and myth. Her perceptive, convincing, and powerful analysis of the evolution of 'Highlandism' breaks new ground. Anyone who cares about Scottish culture, heritage and tourism must read her book. Highland Heritage is essential reading for Scots all over the world."--Margaret Bennett, Glasgow University School of Scottish Studies

"Celeste Ray's carefully researched and well-written ethnographic study adds to our understanding not only of the Scots at home and abroad, but also of the process of ritual itself and the ways that immigrants everywhere symbolize, enact, and reinvent their cultural worlds. It will prove valuable to scholars and students in anthropology, sociology, history, American studies, and to all readers interested in the history and culture of the American South and Scotland."--Gwen Kennedy Neville, author of Kinship and Pilgrimage: Rituals of Reunion in American Protestant Culture and The Mother Town: Civic Ritual, Symbol, and Experience in the Borders of Scotland

"Not until the exhaustive research of anthropologist Celeste Ray has any serious attempt been made to explain the overzealous love of tartans and clans by Scottish Americans. Now, Ray has done so with skill and aplomb."--Donald F. McDonald, cofounder of the Grandfather Mountain Highland Games

"By subjecting Scottish heritage events to academic scrutiny, Celeste Ray has brought a valuable perspective to celebrations such as the Grandfather Mountain Highland Games."--Hugh Morton

Table of Contents
Preface xi
Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Chapter 1. Highlandism and Scottish Identity: The Origins of Contemporary Ethnic Expression
Chapter 2. Scottish Heritage and Revival in North Carolina
Chapter 3. Kith and Clan in the Scottish-American Community
Chapter 4. The Brigadoon of the Scottish-American Community: Scottish Highland Games and Gatherings
Chapter 5. Heritage Pilgrimage and a Sense for Scottish Places
Chapter 6. Warrior Scots
Chapter 7. Scottish Heritage, Southern Style
Conclusion
Appendix
Glossary
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Illustrations
Reenactors and a volunteer demonstrate how Highlanders put on the feileadh mor
Major Don O'Connor and Ronald McLeod in traditional dress
Wayne Cathey exhibits his tartan
The McArthur family of Pinehurst, North Carolina
Flora MacDonald, as painted in 1747 by Richard Wilson
Donald MacDonald, Honored Guest at the 1995 Grandfather Mountain Highland Games
John Burnett displays his family tree
Karen Becker of the Scottish Spinning and Weaving Society
Award-winning contestants in the Grandfather Highland dancing competitions with their trophies
Lt. Col. David Cone and Charlotte Patterson at the Loch Norman Highland Games
Larry Satchwell at the Grandfather Mountain Games, with athletic judge Ross Morrison
Chief David Menzies at the Stone Mountain Highland Games
The 78th Highland Frasers at the Loch Norman Highland Games
Ward Weems of Weems and Sons vendors
Members of the Lowland "Clan Kerr" at the Stone Mountain Highland Games
The "back" area of Grandfather Mountain clan tents
Reconstruction of a Blackhouse at the Kingussie Highland Folk Museum, Scotland
Donald MacDonald conducts American Scots to "Carolina Hill" on the Isle of Skye
Traditional Highland cairn in the Creag Meagaidh Nature Reserve in the Grampian Mountains, Scotland
Grandfather Mountain memorial clan cairn
Wreath-laying at the Highlanders' monument at Moores Creek Bridge Battleground
Loyalist Highlander Ken Bloom at the 1995 Moores Creek Bridge encampment
The Oglethorpe Highlanders at the 1997 Stone Mountain Highland Games
A reproduction of MacIan's famous 1845 print of a MacLachlan
David Dysart displays a spiked targe
"Pulling a coin check" at the Grandfather Games
A Scottish-American Military Society color guard in the 1995 Culloden Games Tartan Parade, Georgia
Carl Ford at the 1996 Scottish Games and Celtic Festival, Biloxi, Mississippi
Tennessean Robert Wright and his tattoo commemorating the demise of two lost causes
Lighting "the Fire on the Mountain" at Grandfather Mountain
Beth Todd of Stately Oaks Mansion and VMI cadet Daniel Hendrix
Mike Bowen at the Stone Mountain Highland Games in 1997
"Chief Chinubbie" with musician Alex Beaton
Ken Long of Charlotte dressed as a Shawnee
Keith Shelton in "blue face"
Maps
1. Scotland
2. North Carolina in 1770
3. Clan and Family Territories of Scotland
4. The Highland Games Field at Grandfather Mountain
Figure
1. The Royal House of Stewart (Stuart) and the Hanoverian Branch