The Social Origins of the Urban South: Race, Gender, and Migration in Nashville and Middle Tennessee, 1890-1930

By: Louis M. Kyriakoudes

Price: $19.95

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In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, thousands of black and white southerners left farms and rural towns to try their fate in the region's cities. This transition brought about significant economic, social, and cultural changes in both urban centers and the countryside. Focusing on Nashville and its Middle Tennessee hinterland, Louis Kyriakoudes explores the impetus for this migration and illuminates its effects on regional development.

Kyriakoudes argues that increased rural-to-urban migration in the late nineteenth century grew out of older seasonal and circular migration patterns long employed by southern farm families. These mobility patterns grew more urban-oriented and more permanent as rural blacks and whites turned increasingly to urban migration in order to cope with rapid economic and social change.

The urban economy was particularly welcoming to women, offering freedom from the male authority that dominated rural life. African Americans did not find the same freedoms, however, as whites found ways to harness the forces of modernization to deny them access to economic and social opportunity. By linking urbanization, economic and social change, and popular cultural institutions, Kyriakoudes lends insight into the development of an urban, white, working-class identity that reinforced racial divisions and laid the demographic and social foundations for today's modern, urban South.

Title: The Social Origins of the Urban South: Race, Gender, and Migration in Nashville and Middle Tennessee, 1890-1930

Author: Louis M. Kyriakoudes

Illustrator: Reg. Price: $19.95

Categories: Tennessee,

Publisher: University of North Carolina Press: 2003

ISBN Number: 0807854840

ISBN Number 13: 9780807854846

Binding: paperback

Book Details: 248 pages, 6 x 9 1/4, 12 illus., 18 tables, 4 maps, 14 figs., appends., notes, bibl., index , paperback, University of North Carolina Press

Seller ID: 854840

Description: In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, millions of black and white southerners left farms and rural towns to try their fate in the region's cities. This transition brought about significant economic, social, and cultural changes in both urban centers and the countryside. Focusing on Nashville and its Middle Tennessee hinterland, Louis Kyriakoudes explores the impetus for this migration and illuminates its effects on regional development.
Kyriakoudes argues that increased rural-to-urban migration in the late nineteenth century grew out of older seasonal and circular migration patterns long employed by southern farm families. These mobility patterns grew more urban-oriented and more permanent as rural blacks and whites turned increasingly to urban migration in order to cope with rapid economic and social change.
The urban economy was particularly welcoming to women, offering freedom from the male authority that dominated rural life. African Americans did not find the same freedoms, however, as whites found ways to harness the forces of modernization to deny them access to economic and social opportunity. By linking urbanization, economic and social change, and popular cultural institutions, Kyriakoudes lends insight into the development of an urban, white, working-class identity that reinforced racial divisions and laid the demographic and social foundations for today's modern, urban South.

About Author
Louis M. Kyriakoudes is associate professor of history at the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg.

Reviews
"A rigorously argued and lucidly written study on an extremely important but under-explored aspect of southern history: the role of migration in the urbanization process in the New South. With its close attention to both the rural and the urban dimensions of this process, Kyriakoudes's well-researched and broadly interdisciplinary study represents a breakthrough in the literature in southern urban history. A very impressive debut."--Peter A. Coclanis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Chapter 1. The Grand Ole Opry and the Urban South
Chapter 2. City and Hinterland
Chapter 3. The Countryside
Chapter 4. Turning to Urban Markets
Chapter 5. Leaving the Countryside
Chapter 6. Going to Nashville
Chapter 7. Men's Work
Chapter 8. Women's Work
Conclusion
Appendix. Middle Tennessee and Nashville Net Migration Estimates
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Illustrations
Uncle Dave Macon
DeFord Bailey
Lasses and Honey
Map of the Booster Club's 1924 trip to Nashville's hinterland
Cartoon showing Nashville's wholesalers as a magnet to merchants
An eroded Tennessee farm
A woman feeding chickens on a farm
Advertisement for cream separators
Tennessee farmers who also worked as tie hackers
Tennessee tenant farmer, c. 1930
The one-room schoolhouse
Advertisement for a commercial laundry
Tables
3.1. Tenancy Rates of Middle Tennessee Farms, by Geographical Region, 1890-1930
3.2. Number of Middle Tennessee Farms, by Geographical Region, 1890-1930
5.1. Tennessee-born Blacks Residing in Other States, by Census Region, 1890-1930
5.2. Tennessee-born Whites Residing in Other States, by Census Region, 1890-1930
6.1. Estimated Net Migration of U.S.-Born Population to Nashville, Tennessee, 1890-1930
6.2. Gross Migration of U.S.-Born Males, Ages Twenty-One to Thirty-One, to Nashville, Tennessee, 1917
7.1. Occupational Rank of Nashville Males, Ages Twenty-One to Thirty-One, by Migration Status, 1917
7.2. Occupational Rank of White Nashville Males, Ages Twenty-One to Thirty-One, by Migration Status, 1917
7.3. Occupational Rank of Black Nashville Males, Ages Twenty-One to Thirty-One, by Migration Status, 1917
7.4. Occupational Rank of White Nashville Male Migrants, Ages Twenty-One to Thirty-One, by Region of Birth, 1917
7.5. Occupational Rank of Black Nashville Male Migrants, Ages Twenty-One to Thirty-One, by Region of Birth, 1917
7.6. Occupational Rank of White Nashville Male Migrants, Ages Twenty-One to Thirty-One, by Size of Birthplace, 1917
7.7. Occupational Rank of Black Nashville Male Migrants, Ages Twenty-One to Thirty-One, by Size of Birthplace, 1917
8.1. Nashville Women Age Ten and Older Gainfully Employed, 1900-1930
8.2. Occupational Distribution of Nashville Working Women, 1900-1930, by Race
Figures
3.1. White Tenant Farmers as a Percent of All White Farmers, by Age, Tennessee, 1900-1920
3.2. Black Tenant Farmers as a Percent of All Black Farmers, by Age, Tennessee, 1900-1920
3.3. Middle Tennessee Farmland Values, 1890-1930
3.4. Distribution of Middle Tennessee Farms, by Size, 1890, 1910, and 1930
5.1. Estimated Net Migration Rates of U.S.-Born Population from Rural Middle Tennessee, by Sex and Race, 1890-1930
5.2. Age Structure of Net Migration of U.S.-Born Population from Rural Middle Tennessee, by Sex and Race, 1890-1900
5.3. Age Structure of Net Migration of U.S.-Born Population from Rural Middle Tennessee, by Sex and Race, 1900-1910
5.4. Age Structure of Net Migration of U.S.-Born Population from Rural Middle Tennessee, by Sex and Race, 1910-1920
5.5. Age Structure of Net Migration of U.S.-Born Population from Rural Middle Tennessee, by Sex and Race, 1920-1930
6.1. Estimated Net Migration Rates of U.S.-Born Population to Nashville, Tennessee, by Sex and Race, 1890-1930
6.2. Age Structure of Net Migration of U.S.-Born Population to Nashville, Tennessee, by Sex and Race, 1890-1900
6.3. Age Structure of Net Migration of U.S.-Born Population to Nashville, Tennessee, by Sex and Race, 1900-1910
6.4. Age Structure of Net Migration of U.S.-Born Population to Nashville, Tennessee, by Sex and Race, 1910-1920
6.5. Age Structure of Net Migration of U.S.-Born Population to Nashville, Tennessee, by Sex and Race, 1920-1930
Maps
2.1. Nashville Correspondent Banks, 1890
2.2. Nashville Correspondent Banks, 1925
3.1 Middle Tennessee Study Area and Agricultural Subregions
6.1. Place of Birth of Tennessee-Born Male Migrants to Nashville, 1917