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Cherokee

 - 15 items found in your search
Native American:Cherokee

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1 CD: 1880 Cherokee Nation Census
Barbara Benge
2000, CD, Searchable, Adobe Acrobat, v6, PC or Mac, 644 pp, Heritage Books
"One of the pivotal rolls used for eligibility status for enrollment, whether Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw, Seminole or Freedmen was the 1880 Cherokee Nation census." This book is a transcription of the 1880 Cherokee Nation census, complete with census card numbers, which were added in 1900. The Dawes Commission used these census cards for tribal enrollment, and each tribe had their own census cards. Some persons may appear on multiple cards if they were adopted by an associated tribe, as in the case of the Shawnee and Delaware who often appear on Cherokee Census cards. There are also separate cards for the Freedmen of the tribe. Entries are grouped by districts-- Canadian, Cooweescoowee, Delaware, Flint, Goingsnake, Illinois, Saline, Sequoyah, Tahlequah and Orphans. Transcribed entries include names, race, age and sex, with additional remarks by the original census takers transcribed when legible. A census column notes the 1900 Dawes census card numbers with some 1883 and 1894 entries, and indicates dead for persons that died between 1880 and 1900. Marital status is noted with yes or no. A fullname index, with surnames corrected or unified whenever possible, enhances this work.
CD1419 
Price: 20.00 USD

 

 

2 CD: 1890 Cherokee Nation Census
Barbara Benge
2002, CD, Searchable, Adobe Acrobat, v5, PC and Mac, 863 pp, paperback, Heritage Books
This book contained on this CD-ROM is a transcription of the 1890 Cherokee Nation Census in the same format used by the Federal 1890 census. This census will help bridge the gap between the 1880 Cherokee Nation census and the Dawes roll done in 1902. Districts—Canadian, Cooweescoowee, Delaware, Flint, Goingsnake, Illinois, Saline, Sequoyah, Tahlequah, and Orphans, group entries. The transcription of this census is divided into two volumes that include names, race, age, marital status and sex, with additional remarks by the original census takers. Full name index. This ELECTRONIC TEXT CD-ROM uses the Adobe Acrobat Reader provided free on the CD for Windows and Macintosh operating systems. ***Also available in a 2-volume paperbound book set***
CD2010 
Price: 24.00 USD

 
 
1880 Cherokee Nation Census, Indian Territory (Oklahoma), Barbara L. Benge


3 1880 Cherokee Nation Census, Indian Territory (Oklahoma)
Barbara L. Benge
(2000), 2006, 8½x11, paper, index, 2 vols, 606 pp, Heritage Books, Inc
This book is a transcription of the 1880 Cherokee Nation census, complete with census card numbers, which were added in 1900. The Dawes Commission used these census cards for tribal enrollment, and each tribe had their own census cards. Some persons may appear on multiple cards if they were adopted by an associated tribe, as in the case of the Shawnee and Delaware who often appear on Cherokee census cards. There are also separate cards for the Freedmen of the tribe.Entries are grouped by districts-Canadian, Cooweescoowee, Delaware, Flint, Goingsnake, Illinois, Saline, Sequoyah, Tahlequah and Orphans. Transcribed entries include names, race, age and sex, with additional remarks by the original census takers transcribed when legible. A census column notes the 1900 Dawes census card numbers with some 1883 and 1894 entries, and indicates dead for persons that died between 1880 and 1900. Marital status is noted with yes or no. A fullname index, with surnames corrected or unified whenever possible, enhances this work.
B1576 
Price: 78.00 USD

 

 

4 CD: African Cherokee Connections: Reconstructed Families from the Miller Roll "A"
Billy Dubois Edgington
2002, CD, Searchable, Adobe Acrobat, v5, PC and Mac, 8550 pp, Heritage Books
Excellent source on CD-ROM! In May 1905 the Eastern Cherokee were awarded one million dollars as reparations for violations of various treaties, mainly those of 1835-1836 and 1846. In order to qualify for a share of this money the claimants had to be alive on 28 May 1906 and had to prove that they were either a descendant of an Eastern Cherokee, or had been living at the time of the treaties involved. 48,847 claims were filed with the commission established to disburse the funds. Guion Miller headed the commission and his name has been attached to the resulting roll. This present study concentrates on those claimants who were of African descent claiming Cherokee connections. All but one or two of these claimants were rejected because most had been slaves of the Cherokees and were not deemed to have been party to the treaties. Many of them seem to have established some blood connection to the Eastern Cherokees and were still rejected if one or more of their ancestors had been slaves. Several family groups, especially those who settled in Indiana, were descendants of free blacks who left the Carolinas rather than become slaves. One group lists several family members who returned to Africa to settle in Liberia. Every claimant is identified with an individual claim number. Every claim number that mentioned an individual is included in the notes for that individual. Census records are noted by year and location. The basic source for this study was the 348 rolls of microfilm “Cherokee (Eastern) Applications of U. S. Court Claims, 1906-1909” (NARA M1104, rolls 1-348) and the 12 microfilm rolls of “Cherokee (Eastern) Enrollment by Guion Miller (NARA M685, rolls 1-12). Additionally, many of the claimants and their families were checked against the US Federal Census records for 1910, 1900, and several groups were followed back into the 1880 and 1870 records. The third source used extensively in this reconstruction was “Index to the Cherokee Freedman Enrollment cards of the Dawes Commission 1901-1906” by Jo Ann Curls Page, published by Heritage Books of Bowie, Maryland.
CD2207 
Price: 39.95 USD

 
 

 

5 CD: Vital Information from the Guion Miller Rolls: Eastern Cherokee Court of Claims, 1906-1909
Billy Dubois Edgington and Carol Anne Buswell
1999, CD, Searchable, Adobe Acrobat, v5, PC and Mac, 1020 pp, Heritage Books
In 1904 the Eastern Cherokees won a million dollar judgment against the U.S. because of its violations of the treaties of 1835-6 and 1845. The payments were to go to all living persons who had been members of the tribe at the time of the treaties, or to their descendants. The Miller files contain about 46,000 applications submitted by members of the tribe, or their descendants. This CD-ROM lists all applicants alphabetically, and provides application numbers for further research. Each entry gives the birth year, birth place, and residence-at-application, maiden names when given, and the Soundex code for the person’s surname. This work is in all-electronic format. The CD-ROM uses the powerful Adobe Acrobat reader (for Windows, provided free on the CD; the corresponding viewer for Macintosh and other operating systems can be downloaded free of charge from www.Adobe.com). The software allows the user to search all the text. When you run a search, the "hits" are highlighted on each page for easy identification.
CD1061 
Price: 30.00 USD

 
Miscellaneous Cherokee and Choctaw Records, 1800-1900, Bob Curry


6 Miscellaneous Cherokee and Choctaw Records, 1800-1900
Bob Curry
(2001), 2008, 8½x11, paper, index, 58 pp, Heritage Books
Contains a wealth of transcribed payment rolls for the Cherokee and Choctaw Indian Nations: the Eastern Cherokee Annuity Roll, the 1856 Choctaw Annuity Roll, a list of Choctaw students educated in the States, and Choctaw Civil War soldiers. These rolls have never-before been formally published. The transcribed bible records from Rhoda Pitchlynns lost bible are also included. The Pitchlynns were a prominent Choctaw family in Indian Territory. The original Indian Rolls are housed at the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington D.C. The Eastern Cherokee Annuity Roll of 1871 lists full name, Miller roll number, sex and age, immigration date, and amount per capita. Choctaw Nation school records (1800s-1900s) list full name, year of graduation, and name of school. The Choctaw Roll (1856) lists certificate number, name of claimant and amount paid. Rhoda Pitchlynns bible records list full name, plus dates of birth and death. A full name index adds to the research value of this book.
C1912 
Price: 14.00 USD

 
 

 

7 CD: Eastern Cherokee Census Records, 1899-1927
Heritage Books Digital Microfilm
2000, CD, Searchable, Adobe Acrobat, PC and Mac, 1842 pp, Heritage Books
With An Introduction by Carol Buswell. This digital microfilm CD contains electronic image reprints of the Eastern Cherokee census records from Rolls 22 to 24 of the national Archives microfilm publication M595. A total of 22 censuses (1899 to 1927) are included. The types of data in these censuses is comparable to that found in the main federal censuses of this era.
CD1521 
Price: 29.50 USD

 
The Buffalo Ridge Cherokee: A Remnant of a Great Nation Divided, Horace R. Rice, Ed.D


8 The Buffalo Ridge Cherokee: A Remnant of a Great Nation Divided
Horace R. Rice, Ed.D
(1995), 2007, 5½x8½, paper, index, 348 pp, Heritage Books
Preliminary chapters give the historical background of the Cherokees, from their first encounters with European settlers through the Revolution and many broken treaties to the infamous Trail of Tears. Other chapters explain how careless record keeping through previous generations has recorded the bi- and tri-racial people of the Buffalo Ridge as white, black, mulatto or free colored without acknowledging the Native American heritage which is the most prevalent of all the racial types in the area. Dr. Rice provides wonderful information about particular families in the area, accumulated through interviews with these families.
R0296 
Price: 29.00 USD

 
 
Cherokee by Blood: Volume 1, Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims 1906-1910, Applications 1-1550, Jerry Wright Jordan


9 Cherokee by Blood: Volume 1, Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims 1906-1910, Applications 1-1550
Jerry Wright Jordan
(1987), 2005, 5½x8½, paper, index, 498 pp, Heritage Books
In 1904 the Eastern Cherokees won a million dollar judgment against the U.S. because of its violations of the treaties of 1835-36 and 1845. The payments were to go to all living persons who had been members of the Cherokee tribe at the time of the treaties, or to their descendants if they were deceased. Over 46,000 people filed claims. This series presents detailed abstracts of those applications including numerous verbatim transcriptions of affidavits by the applicants, their families and friends. Since most of the applications were descendants, and had to prove their descent, the quantity of genealogical data in these volumes is impressive.
J0048 
Price: 40.00 USD

 
Cherokee by Blood: Volume 2,  Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U.S. Court of Claims 1906-1910, Applications 1551-4200, Jerry Wright Jordan


10 Cherokee by Blood: Volume 2, Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U.S. Court of Claims 1906-1910, Applications 1551-4200
Jerry Wright Jordan
(1988), 2005, 5½x8½, paper, index, 502 pp, Heritage Books
In 1904 the Eastern Cherokees won large cash settlements from the United States because of violations of the treaties of 1835-36 and 1845. Over a million dollars was appropriated by Congress to settle the claims. The payments were to go to all living persons who had been members of the Eastern Cherokee tribe at the time of the treaty, or to their descendants if they were deceased. Over 46,000 people filed claims. This series of volumes presents detailed abstracts of those applications including numerous verbatim transcriptions of affidavits by the applicants, their families and friends. Since most of the applicants were descendants, rather than original tribe members, and had to prove their descent, the quantity of genealogical information in these volumes is staggering. About nine-tenths of the applicants lived west of the Mississippi in the early 1900s when they made their applications, with the balance living predominantly in the southeast. Although the applicants had to have Indian ancestry, the majority were nominally white; a significant number of blacks are also included. There is a complete name index.
J0111 
Price: 40.00 USD

 
 
Cherokee by Blood: Volume 3, Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U.S. Court of Claims 1906-1910, Applications 4201-7250, Jerry Wright Jordan


11 Cherokee by Blood: Volume 3, Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U.S. Court of Claims 1906-1910, Applications 4201-7250
Jerry Wright Jordan
(1988), 2007, 5½x8½, paper, index, 502 pp, Heritage Books
In 1904 the Eastern Cherokees won a million dollar judgment against the U.S. because of its violations of the treaties of 1835-36 and 1845. The payments were to go to all living persons who had been members of the Cherokee tribe at the time of the treaties, or to their descendants if they were deceased. Over 46,000 people filed claims. This series presents detailed abstracts of those applications including numerous verbatim transcriptions of affidavits by the applicants, their families and friends. Since most of the applications were descendants, and had to prove their descent, the quantity of genealogical data in these volumes is impressive.
J0160 
Price: 40.00 USD

 
Cherokee by Blood: Volume 7, Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims 1906-1910, Applications 16746-20100, Jerry Wright Jordan


12 Cherokee by Blood: Volume 7, Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims 1906-1910, Applications 16746-20100
Jerry Wright Jordan
(1991), 2007, 5½x8½, paper, index, 506 pp, Heritage Books
In 1904 the Eastern Cherokees won large cash settlements from the United States because of violations of the treaties of 1835-36 and 1845. Over a million dollars was appropriated by Congress to settle the claims. The payments were to go to all living persons who had been members of the Eastern Cherokee tribe at the time of the treaty, or to their descendants if they were deceased. Over 46,000 people filed claims. This series of volumes presents detailed abstracts of those applications including numerous verbatim transcriptions of affidavits by the applicants, their families and friends. Since most of the applicants were descendants, rather than original tribe members, and had to prove their descent, the quantity of genealogical information in these volumes is staggering. About nine-tenths of the applicants lived west of the Mississippi in the early 1900s when they made their applications, with the balance living predominantly in the southeast. Although the applicants had to have Indian ancestry, the majority were nominally white; a significant number of blacks are also included. There is a complete name index.
J0446 
Price: 40.00 USD

 
 
Cherokee by Blood: Volume 8, Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims 1906-1910, Applications 20101-23800, Jerry Wright Jordan


13 Cherokee by Blood: Volume 8, Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims 1906-1910, Applications 20101-23800
Jerry Wright Jordan
(1992), 2007, 5½x8½, paper, index, 506 pp, Heritage Books
In 1904 the Eastern Cherokees won a million dollar judgment against the U.S. because of its violations of the treaties of 1835-36 and 1845. The payments were to go to all living persons who had been members of the Cherokee tribe at the time of the treaties, or to their descendants if they were deceased. Over 46,000 people filed claims. This series presents detailed abstracts of those applications including numerous verbatim transcriptions of affidavits by the applicants, their families and friends. Since most of the applications were descendants, and had to prove their descent, the quantity of genealogical data in these volumes is impressive.
J0573 
Price: 40.00 USD

 

 

14 Georgia 1860 Agricultural Census: Volume 1 comprises the counties of Appling, Baker, Baldwin, Banks, Berrien, Bibb, Brooks, Bryan, Bullock, Burke, Butts, Calhoun, Camden, Campbell, Carroll, Cass, Catoosa, Chatham, Charlton, Chattahooche, Chattooga, and Cherokee
Linda L. Green
(2003), 2005, 8½x11, paper, index, 228 pp, Heritage Books
Often times when an individual was missed on the regular U.S. Census, he would appear on this agricultural census. So you might try checking this census for your missing relatives. Unfortunately, many of the Agricultural Census records have not survived, but some have remained and they yield unique information about how people lived. There are 48 columns of information, six of which are transcribed here: name of the owner, improved acreage, unimproved acreage, cash value of the farm, value of farm implements and machinery, and value of livestock.
G3162 
Price: 36.00 USD

 
 
Only The Names Remain,  Volume 3: Saline District & Cherokee Orphanage, Sandi Garrett


15 Only The Names Remain, Volume 3: Saline District & Cherokee Orphanage
Sandi Garrett
(2001), 2008, 8½x11, paper, index, 104 pp, Heritage Books
This volume, linking the Drennen Roll and the Guion Miller Applications, is a valuable addition to the growing body of genealogical works devoted to researching Cherokee ancestry. Abbreviations note the relationships between applicants. Volume 3 lists the names recorded in the 1880 Cherokee Orphanage census, and the names of all family groups and family members living in the Saline District of OK recorded in the Drennen Roll, cross-referenced with the names and application numbers of relatives who later filed Guion Miller Applications.
G1779 
Price: 17.50 USD

     


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