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Arkansas

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USA:Arkansas
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Journey of Hope:  The Back-To-Africa Movement in Arkansas in the Late 1800s, Kenneth C. Barnes.


1 Journey of Hope: The Back-To-Africa Movement in Arkansas in the Late 1800s
Kenneth C. Barnes.
288 pages, 6 x 9 1/4, 24 illus., 4 maps, 2 figs., notes, bibl., index, paperback, University of North Carolina Press
Liberia was founded by the American Colonization Society (ACS) in the 1820s as an African refuge for free blacks and liberated American slaves. While interest in African migration waned after the Civil War, it roared back in the late nineteenth century with the rise of Jim Crow segregation and disfranchisement throughout the South. The back-to-Africa movement held great new appeal to the South's most marginalized citizens, rural African Americans. Nowhere was this interest in Liberia emigration greater than in Arkansas. More emigrants to Liberia left from Arkansas than any other state in the 1880s and 1890s.
In Journey of Hope, Kenneth C. Barnes explains why so many black Arkansas sharecroppers dreamed of Africa and how their dreams of Liberia differed from the reality. This rich narrative also examines the role of poor black farmers in the creation of a black nationalist identity and the importance of the symbolism of an ancestral continent.
Based on letters to the ACS and interviews of descendants of the emigrants in war-torn Liberia, this study captures the life of black sharecroppers in the late 1800s and their dreams of escaping to Africa.

About Author
Kenneth C. Barnes is professor of history at the University of Central Arkansas. His most recent book is Who Killed John Clayton? Political Violence and the Emergence of the New South, 1861-1893.

Reviews
"Using his considerable writing skills, Kenneth Barnes crafts a highly readable narrative that turns this story about a relatively small group of people into a fascinating account that speaks to many issues of the era--race relations in the South, the meanings of Reconstruction's demise, the lives and hopes of African Americans, and felt connections to Africa. Above all, anyone interested in the lives of poor black men and women in the late nineteenth century will find this a compelling read."--James H. Meriwether, author of Proudly We Can Be Africans: Black Americans and Africa, 1935-1961

"Journey of Hope is a poignant portrait of the overlooked back-to-Africa movement in the American South. More than just a searing indictment of late-nineteenth-century American racism, this book provides a deeply researched and sensitive account of the courage, naïveté, and desperation of those blacks who believed that they could only enjoy the fullness of freedom in Africa."--W. Fitzhugh Brundage, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Chapter 1. The Liberia Exodus Arkansas Colony, 1877-1880
Chapter 2. A Movement Ebbs and Flows: The 1880s
Chapter 3. Hope Ignites: Liberia Fever, 1888-1891
Chapter 4. Gaw'n t' 'Beria: The Crisis of 1892
Chapter 5. Troublemakers
Chapter 6. Missions
Chapter 7. The Meaning of Africa
Chapter 8. The Last Voyages
Chapter 9. In Liberia
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Illustrations
The Liberian coast
William Coppinger
Anthony L. Stanford
Arkansas emigrants to Liberia in New York City, 1880
Bishop Henry McNeal Turner
Handbill for black emigration meeting, 1890
A lynching in Arkansas, ca. 1890
Caricature of a black couple on the way to Liberia
Liberian exhibit at the Columbian Exposition, 1893
The Reverend Alfred L. Ridgel
Steamship on the St. Paul River, Liberia
Methodist missionaries from Arkansas en route to Liberia
Departure of the steamship Horsa, 1895
Departure of the steamship Laurada, 1896
Funeral for a passenger aboard the Laurada
Laurada passengers stepping onto African soil
Ashmun Street, Monrovia
Road leading to Morning Star Baptist Church, Johnsonville, Liberia
Cornerstone of Morning Star Baptist Church
The ACS warehouse in Monrovia
A stick-and-thatch structure in Liberia
A settler house in Liberia
An indigenous African village in Liberia
Taylor Swift after his return home from Liberia
Maps
Arkansas
Black population percentage in Arkansas counties, 1890
Arkansas post offices from which letters were sent to the ACS, 1891
Liberia, 1895
Figures
Number of letters from Arkansas to the ACS, 1888-1892
Number of Arkansas applicants to the ACS for Liberia emigration, 1888-1892
855502 
Price: 19.95 USD

 
The Seed of Sally Good'n: A Black Family of Arkansas, 1833-1953, Ruth Polk Patterson


2 The Seed of Sally Good'n: A Black Family of Arkansas, 1833-1953
Ruth Polk Patterson
208 pages, 6 x 9, illus, paperback, University of Kentucky Press
Spencer Polk was born of an African-Indian slave woman known as Sally, and her master, Taylor Polk, a descendant of one of America's first families and one of the earliest white settlers in the Arkansas Territory. A favored slave, Spencer Polk became a prosperous farmer and landowner in southwestern Arkansas and the founder of a numerous and energetic family. Since emancipation the family homestead he built on Muddy Fork Creek has housed succeeding generations and has drawn back those who sought their fortunes elsewhere.
In this new paperback edition, Ruth Polk Patterson, a granddaughter of Spencer Polk who was born and raised in the log house he built, traces the life of Polk and his family from his birth in 1833 to the present generation. The skillful blending of folklore, history, and personal insight makes The Seed of Sally Good'n an excellent contribution to the long neglected history of middle-class African Americans.

About Author
Ruth Polk Patterson (1930-1989) held a doctorate in American Studies from Emory University and taught in the Little Rock public school system.

Reviews
“[Patterson’s] family history, past and present, is a salutary corrective of stereotyped images of black life.”—Times Literary Supplement

“Provides new and deeply authentic answers to old questions. . . . An important book.”—Journal of American Folklore
108764 
Price: 19.95 USD

 
 

 

3 CD: Index To The Arkansas General Land Office, 1820-1907, Volumes 1-10
Sherida K. Eddlemon
2003, CD, Graphic Images, Adobe Acrobat, PC and MAC, 2945 pp, Heritage Books
Now on CD-ROM! Arkansas was explored by Europeans as early as 1541, with Hernando DeSoto blazing the trails, and again in 1673, when French explorer La Salle claimed the wilderness in the name of France. In 1762 France ceded the area to Spain, and Americans began settling in the Arkansas area in 1783. In 1803, it finally became U.S. territory, requiring residents to file claims with the government in order to prove legal ownership of the land. These volumes contain abstracts of land transactions over an 87-year span, and consist of information such as purchaser's name, legal description and location of the land, the amount of land in acres, the county, and date of purchase. Each preface reveals sources to the original records, providing even more leads. Names are listed alphabetically and are thus easy to find.
CD2446 
Price: 29.95 USD

 
Index to the Arkansas General Land Office 1820-1907, Volume Seven: Covering the Counties of Jackson, Clay, Greene, Sharp, Lawrence, Mississippi, Craighead, Poinsett and Randolph, Sherida K. Eddlemon


4 Index to the Arkansas General Land Office 1820-1907, Volume Seven: Covering the Counties of Jackson, Clay, Greene, Sharp, Lawrence, Mississippi, Craighead, Poinsett and Randolph
Sherida K. Eddlemon
(1998), 2008, 5½x8½, paper, alphabetical, 212 pp, Heritage Books, Inc
Spanish explorer Hernando DeSoto blazed the trails of the Arkansas area in 1541, followed by French explorers Louis Joliet and Jacques Marquette. In 1682, French explorer La Salle claimed this wilderness in the name of France, naming it Louisiana. There were many Native American tribes living in this region: The Osage, Caddo, Akansa and the Quapaw. France then ceded this region to Spain in 1762. Spain permitted Americans to settle in the Arkansas area in 1783. In 1801 Spain returned the Louisiana area to France. The U.S. acquired this territory with the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, requiring residents to file claims with the government in order to prove legal ownership of the land. Between 1820 and 1906, more than 9,800 entries were filed for the eastern Arkansas counties of Jackson, Clay, Greene, Sharp, Lawrence, Mississippi, Craighead, Poinsett and Randolph. Land was sometimes available for only $1.25 per acre, or a parcel could be bid upon. This index of land transactions filed with the General Land Office (GLO) is an excellent resource for the genealogist, containing abstracts of land transactions over an eighty-seven-year span beginning in 1820 after statehood. Records are arranged alphabetically by purchaser's last name, and include: first name, middle initial, a legal description and location of the land, the amount of land in acres, the date of purchase, and the county. Contact information is provided in the preface for obtaining access to the original records. This volume covers the following counties: Jackson, Clay, Greene, Sharp, Lawrence, Mississippi, Craighead, Poinsett and Randolph.
E1384 
Price: 23.50 USD

 
 
Index to the Arkansas General Land Office, 1820-1907, Volume Six: Covering the Counties of Hempstead, Howard, Nevada and Little River Counties, Sherida K. Eddlemon


5 Index to the Arkansas General Land Office, 1820-1907, Volume Six: Covering the Counties of Hempstead, Howard, Nevada and Little River Counties
Sherida K. Eddlemon
(2000), 2009, 5½x8½, paper, alphabetical, 262 pp, Heritage Books
Spanish explorer Hernando DeSoto blazed the trails of the Arkansas area in 1541, followed by French explorers Louis Joliet and Jacques Marquette. In 1682, French explorer La Salle claimed this wilderness in the name of France, naming it Louisiana. There were many Native American tribes living in this region: The Osage, Caddo, Akansa and the Quapaw. France then ceded this region to Spain in 1762. Spain permitted Americans to settle in the Arkansas area in 1783. In 1801 Spain returned the Louisiana area to France. The U.S. acquired this territory with the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, requiring residents to file claims with the government in order to prove legal ownership of the land. Between 1820 and 1906, more than 15,000 entries were filed for the eastern Arkansas counties of Hempstead, Howard, Nevada and Little River. Land was sometimes available for only $1.25 per acre, or a parcel could be bid upon. This index of land transactions filed with the General Land Office (GLO) is an excellent resource for the genealogist, containing abstracts of land transactions over an eighty-seven-year span beginning in 1820 after statehood. Records are arranged alphabetically by purchaser's last name, and include: first name, middle initial, a legal description and location of the land, the amount of land in acres, the date of purchase, and the county. Contact information is provided in the preface for obtaining access to the original records. This volume covers the following counties: Hempstead, Howard, Nevada and Little River.
E1533 
Price: 24.50 USD

 
Compendium of the Confederate Armies: Florida and Arkansas, Stewart Sifakis


6 Compendium of the Confederate Armies: Florida and Arkansas
Stewart Sifakis
(1992), 2007, 5½x8½, paper, index, 160 pp, Heritage Books, Inc
This work is intended to be the companion set to Frederick H. Dyer's Compendium of the War of the Rebellion for the Confederacy. Civil War historians and genealogists with ties to Florida or Arkansas will want to own this volume that details the activities of Florida and Arkansas' units in the Confederacy. Chapters are included for artillery, cavalry and infantry units that are broken down by size: battalions, batteries, companies and regiments, as well as any other special designations such as Militia, State Troops and Volunteers. Entries include (as available) the name of the unit and any nicknames or other mistaken designations; a summary of the unit's organizational details: its date and location of organization, mustering into service, the number of companies for battalion organizations, armament for artillery batteries, surrenders, paroles, exchanges and disbandment or mustering out; the first commanding officer and an alphabetical listing of the other field-grade officers; the brigade and higher-level command assignments of the unit; a listing of the battles and campaigns the unit engaged in; and suggested further reading. A bibliography, a "Battle Index," and a "Name Index" further enhance this excellent resource.
S0695 
Price: 24.95 USD

 


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