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1 The Hidden Half of the Family: A Sourcebook for Women's Genealogy



315829 
Price: 43.50 USD

 
Growing Up in the 1850s : The Journal of Agnes Lee, Agnes Lee, edited with a Foreword by Mary Custis Lee deButts, introduction by Robert E. Lee deButts, Jr. Historical Note by Mary Tyler Freeman Cheek


2 Growing Up in the 1850s : The Journal of Agnes Lee
Agnes Lee, edited with a Foreword by Mary Custis Lee deButts, introduction by Robert E. Lee deButts, Jr. Historical Note by Mary Tyler Freeman Cheek
171 pages, paperback, University of North Carolina Press
Eleanor Agnes Lee, Robert E. Lee's fifth child, began her journal in December 1852 at the early age of twelve. An articulate young woman, her stated ambitions were modest: "The everyday life of a little school girl of twelve years is not startling," she observed in April 1853; but in fact, her five-year record of a southern girl's life is lively, unpredictable, and full of interesting detail.
The journal opens with a description of the Lee family life in their beloved home, Arlington. Like many military families, the Lees moved often, but Agnes and her family always thought of Arlington -- "with its commanding view, fine old trees, and the soft wild luxuriance of its woods" -- as home. When Lee was appointed the superintendent of West Point, the family reluctantly moved with him to the military academy, but wherever she happened to be, Agnes engagingly described weddings, lavish dinners, concerts, and fancy dress balls.
No mere social butterfly, she also recounted hours teaching slaves (an illegal act at that time) and struggling with her conscience. Often she questioned her own spiritual worthiness; in fact, Agnes expressed herself most openly and ardently when examining her religious commitment and reflecting on death. As pious as whe was eager to improve herself, Agnes prayed that "He would satisfy that longing within me to do something to be something."
In 1855 General Lee went to Texas, while his young daughter was enrolled in the elite Virginia Female Institute in Staunton. Agnes' letters to her parents complete the picture that she has given us of herself -- an appealingly conscientious young girl who had a sense of humor, who strove to live up to her parents' expectations, and who returned fully the love so abundantly given to her.
Agnes' last journal entry was made in January 1858, only three years before the Civil War began. In 1873 she died at Lexington at the young age of thirty-two.
The volume continues with recollections by Mildred Lee, the youngest of the Lee children, about her sister Agnes' death and the garden at Arlington. "I wish I could paint that dear old garden!" she writes. "I have seen others, adorned and beautified by Kings and princes, but none ever seemed so fair to me, as the Kingdom of my childhood."
Growing Up in the 1850s includes an introduction by Robert Edward Lee deButts, Jr., great-great-grandson of General Lee, and a historical note about Arlington House by Mary Tyler Freeman Cheek, Director for Virginia of the Robert E. Lee Memorial Association. The editor, Mary Custis Lee deButts, is Agnes Lee's niece.
842435 
Price: 12.95 USD

 
 

 

3 Willett House Collection [Willett Family of Pennsylvania]
Albert J. Willett
1998, cloth, index, 454 pp, Heritage Books
A comprehensive single-surname study of the descendants of eight Willett families who settled in Pennsylvania in colonial times, this volume expands on Mr. Willett's previous book, The Willett Families of North America. The info relating to these families has not been offered in print until now. Every census record that pertains to these families has been abstracted and cited. The info brings each family down to the present time. Many female lines have been included, particularly in the area of Cambria County. This is Mr. Willett's fourth volume of family history; he is a well respected researcher and recognized authority on the Willett family surname.
W0903 
Price: 38.00 USD

 

 

4 Poquoson Families, Volume III: The Topping, Rollins, and Carmines Families of Poquoson District, York County, Virginia
Albert James Willett, Jr
2002, cloth, index, 480 pp, Heritage Books
This work greatly expands on the Topping, Rollins and Carmines chapters of the Poquoson Watermen (pub. 1988). Every census record from 1790 to 1910 known to pertain to these Poquoson families has been abstracted and cited. The current volume brings each family from its earliest mention in the colonial era down to the present. Many female lines have been followed for one or more generations. The text is well illustrated with early photographs and includes a bibliography and an index of every individual known to be related by birth or marriage to the families studied in this volume. Most of the family photographs in this volume have never before been published. This is Mr. Willett's 8th volume of family history, and his 5th volume onthe Messick area of Poquoson, York Co., VA. Mr. Willett is related to mostof the Poquoson families through his maternal Martin and Hopkins ancestors; he is a family history researcher and recognized authority on the Willett surname and on his maternal families of Poquoson, York Co., VA.
W2216 
Price: 48.00 USD

 
 

 

5 Poquoson Families, Volume IV: The Amory, Insley, Firman, and Firth Families
Albert James Willett, Jr.
2003, 5½x8½, cloth, index, 391 pp, Heritage Books
This volume is a surname study of the Amory, Insley, Firman and Firth families of Messick, Poquoson, York County, Virginia. Every census record from 1790 to 1910 known to pertain to these Poquoson families has been abstracted and cited. The current volume brings each family from its earliest mention in the colonial era down to the present. Many female lines have been followed for one or more generations. The text is well illustrated with early photographs and includes a bibliography and an index of every individual known to be related by birth or marriage to the families studied in this volume. Most of the family photographs in this volume have never before been published. This is Mr. Willett's 9th volume of family history, and his 6th volume on the Messick area of Poquoson, York Co., VA. Mr. Willett is related to most of the Poquoson families through his maternal Martin and Hopkins ancestors; he is a family history researcher and recognized authority on the Willett surname and on his maternal families of Poquoson, York Co., VA.
W2379 
Price: 55.00 USD

 
A Genealogical History of Robert Adams of Newbury, Mass., and his Descendants, 1635-1900, Andrew N. Adams


6 A Genealogical History of Robert Adams of Newbury, Mass., and his Descendants, 1635-1900
Andrew N. Adams
(1900), 2002, 5½x8½, paper, indices, 564 pp, Heritage Books
Born in England in 1602, Robert Adams traveled to Ipswich, MA in 1635 with his wife and 2 children. He is thought to be originally from Devonshire, and to be the son of Robert and Elizabeth Sharlon or Sharland. This would make him a cousin of Henry Adams of Braintree (later Quincy, MA), the ancestor of the presidents, John and John Quincy Adams. The work begins by listing the children of Robert Adams. Each entry provides the name, place of birth, date of birth, date and place of death, and any other pertinent historical information known about the persons included, such as: date of marriage, name of spouse, spouse’s birthplace, children and military service. This work follows the Adams family history through 10 generations. There are 3 original surname indices: Names of males with name of their father; Female names with name of Adams; Names other than Adams.
A2145 
Price: 44.50 USD

 
 

 

7 CD: A Genealogy Of The Lake Family Of Great Egg Harbor, In Old Gloucester County, In New Jersey, Descended From John Lake Of Gravesend, Long Island: With Notes on the Gravesend and Staten Island Branches of the Family
Arthur Adams & Sarah A. Risley
(1915), 2005, CD, Graphic Images, Adobe Acrobat, v6, PC and Mac, 430 pp, Heritage Books
This work provides genealogical records for male and female Lakes spanning nine generations. Individual records contain (where available) birth, death and marriage dates, plus lists of children with supplemental genealogical information and comments. Biographical sketches are included for most entries. Generous appendices include three Lake wills, excerpts from Cumberland County Lake Bible records, a letter written by the Hon. Simon Lake during the Civil War, some reminiscences of the Rev. James E. Lake, D.D., miscellaneous notes on the family by Ezra A. Lake, an excerpt from Daniel Lake Collins's 1830 diary, and more.
CD3521 
Price: 15.95 USD

 
A History and Genealogy of Captain John Locke (1627-1696) of Portsmouth and Rye, New Hampshire, and His Descendants, also of Nathaniel Locke of Portsmouth, and a short account of the History of the Lockes in England, Arthur H. Locke, A.M


8 A History and Genealogy of Captain John Locke (1627-1696) of Portsmouth and Rye, New Hampshire, and His Descendants, also of Nathaniel Locke of Portsmouth, and a short account of the History of the Lockes in England
Arthur H. Locke, A.M
(c.1916), 2003, 5½x8½, paper, index, 2 vols., 720 pp, Heritage Books
The bulk of this volume concerns John Locke and his descendants. Female lines are frequently carried forward for several generations, so this work also has much valuable information on many other families of southeastern New Hampshire (Batchelder, Lamprey, Marden, Moulton, Perkins, Philbrick, Sanborn, Trefethern, and many others).
L0889 
Price: 51.00 USD

 
 
Marriage Records of Accomack County, Virginia, 1854-1895 (Recorded in Licenses & Ministers' Returns), Barry W. Miles and Moody K. Miles, III


9 Marriage Records of Accomack County, Virginia, 1854-1895 (Recorded in Licenses & Ministers' Returns)
Barry W. Miles and Moody K. Miles, III
(1997), 2006, 5½x8½, paper, index, 422 pp, Heritage Books
This book contains the 6,225 marriages listed in the Accomack County, Virginia, Marriage Register No. 3, labeled 1854-1896. Marriage dates range from 8 July 1852 to 29 December 1895 with certificate return dates from 30 January 1854 to 31 December 1895. The license and return dates sometimes vary quite a bit. For example, a marriage certificate dated 8 July 1852 was returned on 26 April 1854, almost two years after the marriage. This book also contains 322 marriage licenses in the Accomack County Clerk’s Office dated from 1 January 1854 to 21 January 1875 that were not included in Marriage Register No. 3. The reason for this is that all marriages were not consistently reported to the County Clerk by local ministers until after the Civil War. There may have been a few that were not reported even after that time. The existence of a marriage license, however, does not assure that the marriage actually took place. There were free African Americans in Accomack County from the time of the earliest records (1632) and they came to be called “free-negro” in marriage records. Slavery was prohibited in Federally-occupied Virginia by the new constitution of April 1864, at which time all Accomack County African Americans became free. Helpful lists in this book include female nicknames, variations in surnames, ministers, clerks of court and abbreviations. The entries are arranged alphabetically, and there is an everyname index of brides at the end of the book.
M0680 
Price: 40.00 USD

 
Wertz, Wirt, Wuertz, Etc. Families of Pennsylvania, 1400's-1900, Carolyn C. Choppin


10 Wertz, Wirt, Wuertz, Etc. Families of Pennsylvania, 1400's-1900
Carolyn C. Choppin
(1990), 2008, 5½x8½, paper, index, 436 pp, Heritage Books, Inc
This genealogy is concerned primarily with the ancestry and descendants of Hans Jacob Wurtz, who left the Palatinate and emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1731. The European data concerns his Wurtz lineage and extends back to about 1600. Both male and female lines of descent from Hans Jacob Wurtz are traced in America. In addition, a great deal of data is presented on other families of the Wertz, etc., surnames from the Midwest, Virginia, and North Carolina, whose connection with Hans Jacob Wurtz has not been established. The text is illustrated with a few maps and old family photographs, and there is a very complete index.
C3352 
Price: 35.50 USD

 
 
The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735-1914: With Genealogical Records of the Principal Families, Charles Henry Chandler


11 The History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, 1735-1914: With Genealogical Records of the Principal Families
Charles Henry Chandler
(1914), 2008, 5½x8½, paper, index, 2 vols., 816 pp, Heritage Books, Inc
The majority of the book is devoted to genealogy. 'It was decided to insert no family unless two generations of voters bearing that name had resided here.' Family names are grouped alphabetically: Adams, Ainsworth, Ames, Appleton, Bacon, Balch, Ballard, Bancroft, Barr, Barrett, Bartlett, Batchelder-Batcheller, Bateman, Bates, Bellows, Bent, Bigelow, Binney, Blanchard, Bliss, Blood, Bolton, Boyce, Boyden, Boynton, Breed, Briant, Brooks, Brown, Bucknam, Bullard, Burrows, Burton, Campbell, Carr, Champney, Chandler, Chapman, Chickering, Clark, Collins, Conant, Cooke, Cragin, Cummings, Cushing, Cutter, Davis, Dix, Eaton, Edwards, Emerson, Emery, Everett, Fairbank, Faris, Farnsworth, Farrar, Farwell, Felt, Fiske, Fletcher, Foskett, Foster, Fox, Gibson, Giles, Godding, Gordon, Gould, Greenman, Harris, Hartwell, Hassall, Hastings, Heald, Hildreth, Hills, Hoar, Hodgkins, Holden, Horsley, Hosmer, Houghton, Howe, Hubbard, Jaquith, Jefts, Jones, Kidder, King, Knowlton, Lee, Locke, Lovett, Lowe, Mansfield, Mansur, Marsh, Marshall, Melvin, Miles, Newhall-Newell, Nichols, Nutting, Obear, Page, Parker, Perry, Phelps, Pierce, Pillsbury, Pollard, Porter, Pratt, Prentice, Preston, Prichard, Proctor, Ramsdell, Read-Read, Rhoads, Richardson, Robbins, Roger, Rumrill, Safford, Sanders, Severance, Shattuck, Simonds, Smith, Spaulding, Spear, Start, Stearns, Stickney, Stone, Stratton, Sylvester, Taylor, Tenny, Thayer, Tidder, Towne, Tucker, Underwood, Walker, Wallace, Walton, Webber, Weston, Wetherbee, Wheeler, Wheelock, Whitney, Willard, Williams, Wilson and Woolson are all included. Individual entries for male and female descendents include birth, death, marriage and biographical information as available. The history of New Ipswich includes: road development, land grants and boundary changes, education, the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, Ecclesiastic development, the New Ipswich Academy, cemeteries and much more. Illustrations, indexed maps and charts listing lot (land) assignments, Ipswich Revolutionary War soldiers and Ipswich Civil War soldiers enhance this section.
C1292 
Price: 63.50 USD

 
Hearts West, Chris Enss


12 Hearts West
Chris Enss
128 pages, 6 x 9, paperback, Falcon
WANTED: A girl who will love, honest, true and not sour;a nice little cooing dove, and willing to work in flour.
Desperate to strike it rich during the Gold Rush, thousands of men traveled West to the emerging frontier, where they outnumbered women twelve to one. Only after they arrived did some of them realize how much they missed female companionship.
Hearts West brings to life true stories of mail-order brides of the Gold Rush era. Some found soul mates; others found themselves in desperate situations. Complete with the actual hearts-and-hands personal advertisements that began some of the long-distance courtships, this fascinating book provides an up-close look at the leap of faith these men and women were willing to take.
72756X 
Price: 10.95 USD

 
 
In Public Houses: Drink & the Revolution of Authority in Colonial Massachusetts, David W. Conroy.


13 In Public Houses: Drink & the Revolution of Authority in Colonial Massachusetts
David W. Conroy.
368 pages, 6 x 9 1/4, 8 illus., 2 maps, paperback, University of North Carolina Press
In this study of the role of taverns in the development of Massachusetts society, David Conroy brings into focus a vital and controversial but little-understood facet of public life during the colonial era. Concentrating on the Boston area, he reveals a popular culture at odds with Puritan social ideals, one that contributed to the transformation of Massachusetts into a republican society. Public houses were an integral part of colonial community life and hosted a variety of official functions, including meetings of the courts. They also filled a special economic niche for women and the poor, many of whom turned to tavern-keeping to earn a living. But taverns were also the subject of much critical commentary by the clergy and increasingly restrictive regulations. Conroy argues that these regulations were not only aimed at curbing the spiritual corruption associated with public houses but also at restricting the popular culture that had begun to undermine the colony's social and political hierarchy. Specifically, Conroy illuminates the role played by public houses as a forum for the development of a vocal republican citizenry, and he highlights the connections between the vibrant oral culture of taverns and the expanding print culture of newspapers and political pamphlets in the eighteenth century.

About Author
David W. Conroy is an independent scholar living in Weymouth, Massachusetts.

Reviews
Awards:
Winner of the 1996 Herbert Feis Award, American Historical Association
A 1995 Choice Outstanding Academic Book
A revealing look at the vital role taverns and drink played in the development of Massachusetts society. Concentrating on the Boston area, David Conroy unveils a popular culture at odds with Puritan social ideals, one that contributed to the transformation of Massachusetts into a republican society.

"In Public Houses is an extraordinary work of history that gracefully traces the origins, growth, and functions of these centers of collective drink during the first two centuries of American history. . . . Challeng[es] conventional wisdom on the rigid distinction between oral and print culture, the anglicization of Massachusetts, and the influence of the Puritan ethic during the Revolution."--Choice

"Elegantly written, closely argued, and well supported."--American Historical Review

"Informed by careful use of concepts and methods from political and cultural anthropology, as well as from the new social and cultural history, this excellent book reveals the complexities of New England's social and cultural development as well as the themes of literacy and evolving modernity in their formative era."--Journal of Interdisciplinary History

"A fascinating and important book. . . . Conroy's solid research effort and fine writing provide an extra measure of confidence in his excellent book."--Journal of Social History

"This is a book one completes with a mounting sense of excitement that the author has brought a subject to life. . . . For historians of popular politics, Conroy through his luminous examination of the taverns has established not merely a site where events took place but a source of egalitarian, democratic values with rich implications for others to explore."--William and Mary Quarterly

"Everyone knows that taverns were colorful and important in colonial life. But not until David Conroy's book have we understood how the dynamics of tavern life and the phenomenon of drinking reveal changing patterns of power--the sources of power, how power was used, and how it was contested. In Public Houses is a brilliant blending of social, political, institutional, intellectual, and cultural history. Among this generation's scholarly outpouring on colonial and revolutionary New England, Conroy's book is one of the most fascinating and important."--Gary B. Nash, University of California, Los Angeles

"Conroy insightfully recreates struggles over the context and meaning of drink, the controversial role of poor and female tavernkeepers, and the nature of public order in the eighteenth century."--Barbara Clark Smith, National Museum of American History

"Offers an entirely new dimension to the uneasy connection--and competition--between the elite and plebeian worlds of eighteenth-century Massachusetts, where social hierarchy, economic distress, and political opportunism accompanied the Revolution into the modern era."--David Konig, Washington University
845213 
Price: 27.50 USD

 
The Wadleigh Chronicle, Donald E. Wadleigh


14 The Wadleigh Chronicle
Donald E. Wadleigh
(1992), 2007, 5½x8½, paper, index, 492 pp, Heritage Books, Inc
This extensive study indicates that virtually all of the Wadleighs, Wadleys, Wadles, or Waddles in North America are descended from John Wadleigh of Bristol, England, who settled in Saco, Maine, in 1630, or were slaves on the Wadly Plantation near the town of Wadley, Georgia. This volume traces thirteen generations, and includes the female lines. Each entry is presented in an easy-to-follow manner, with a numbering system and an extensive table of contents naming each family covered. When additional lineage information is known about an individual leading to other immigrants, this has been included. Entries are documented, and a reference section is found at the back of the book. Useful indexes and appendices enhance this comprehensive work. They include an index of direct descendants, an index of locations documenting the presence of Wadleighs and their descendants in nearly every state in the union, and a family name index. Allied families include Gilman, Treworgie, Brewster, Libby, Strong, Holton, Plucker, Pillsbury, Batchelder, Brown, Burnham, Enns, Hogan, Lunstrum, Morrill, Nice, Paige, Smith, Taylor, Thing and Wolfer.
W0712 
Price: 37.00 USD

 
 

 

15 David Lewis (1750-1798) and Joannah Trundle (1754-1810) from Frederick County, Maryland to Harrison County, (West) Virginia: Some Ancestors and Descendants
Doris Jean Post Poinsett
2002, 8½x11, cloth, index, 146 pp, Heritage Books
Two early settlers living in the Province of Maryland around 1700 were Jonathan Lewis and John Trundle I. This is an attempt to provide information about some of their descendants. The title contains the name of one descendant of each settler. This work is divided into two parts to cover descendants of the two settlers and their known wives. The first part is limited to the first four generations of descendants of Jonathan and Mary (---) Lewis and the second part is limited to the first four generations of descendants of John I and Mary (---) Thorley Trundle. Female lines have been extended for only one generation out of the surname. Within those limitations descendants through great-great-grandchildren for whom records were found have been included. Those interested in a probable connection to this Lewis family or thisTrundle family should be able to determine whether there is a connection byresearching more recent generations back to the period covered in this work.Some other related surnames are: Barber, Beall, Beckett, Belt, Browning,Burdette, Davis, Dawson, Fitzgerald, Harvey, Howard, Jenkins, King, Lazenby, Lovelace, Millhouse, Moxley, Mullican, Perine, Spires, Thawley, Thorley, Trunnell, Veatch, Warfield, Watkins, Wilcoxen, Wilson, Windsor, and Wood. Doris Jean Post Poinsett is the author of "Valentin Pfost/Post 1740-1800 of Hardy County, (West) Virginia and Some of His Descendants," which in 1991 received the American Society of Genealogists' Donald Lines Jacobus Award for excellence. Includes a fullname index, early maps, facsimiles of some wills, and numerous transcriptions of wills, deeds, and other court documents.
P2214 
Price: 34.00 USD

 

 

16 Journal of Women's Civil War History, Volume 2
Edited by Eileen Conklin
160 pages, 6 x 9, paperback / softcover, Thomas Publications
A collection of ten more articles on women during the Civil War. Female doctors, nurses on hospital ships in the Mississippi, the women of Sharpsburg, Maryland, and more.
470915 
Price: 11.95 USD

 
 

 

17 This State of Wonders: The Letters of An Iowa Frontier Family, 1858-1861
edited by John Kent Folmar.
186 pages, 7 photos, 3 maps, paperback, University of Iowa Press
When the John Hugh Williams family immigrated to Homer, Iowa, in the 1850s, they had six children, ranging in age from five to twenty. Suddenly land poor, in debt, and caught in the Panic of '57, they sent their eldest son, James, to Georgia to work and add to the family income.
The seventy-five letters collected here represent the family's correspondence to their absent son and brother. From 1858 to 1861, James' sisters, brothers, mother, and father wrote to him frequently, each with distinct views on their daily life and struggles. While Mr. Williams wrote most often about money, farming, and moral advice (he was minister in the Church of New Jerusalem, as well as a merchant and farmer), Mrs. Williams commented on her daily chores, the family's health, the ever-important weather, and her leisure activities, including the contemporary journals and books she read, such as David Copperfield and Jane Eyre. James' sisters and brothers wrote about many concerns, from schoolwork and housework to games and family celebrations in nearby Webster City.
As the letters continue, the affection for the absent James becomes more pronounced. And, as the years go by, the letters touch on more current national trends, including the Pikes Peak Gold Rush and the growing North/South crisis, on which James and his family strongly disagree. James was never to return to Iowa but married and remained in the South, becoming a lieutenant colonel in the Confederate army.
Complete with voices both young and old, male and female, This State of Wonders offers a wealth of information about the daily life of an ordinary family on the Iowa prairie. It is a book to be treasured by all Iowans interested in the early life of their state and by all historians looking for a complete portrait of family life on the midwestern frontier.

Reviews
"This fascinating collection of 75 letters, written by members of the John Hugh Williams family to son and brother James Madison Williams, provides intimate glimpses into frontier life....Through the letters readers share the uncertainties of the Iowa climate, the importance of education (both formal schooling and the considerable access to newspapers and literary works), the shared New Church (Swedenborgian) religious faith, the concern for a daughter's health, the sense of isolation, and the pain of separation from a loved family member....a worthwhile collection, judiciously edited and with a solid interpretative foreword and epilogue."—Choice

"The letters not only recount problems arising from drought, prairie fires, harsh winters, and 'the want of refined and decent society,' but also reveal the family's reactions to the mid-century depression, the discovery of gold at Pikes Peak, and the impending civil war. Further, the recording of prosaic day-to-day experiences provides a rare picture of the daily concerns of women and children on the frontier."—Western Historical Quarterly

"After reading both the letters and the notes, one has a good sense of a substantial frontier family and its concerns and values as well as of its place in the community."—Pacific Historical Review
453411 
Price: 19.95 USD

 

 

18 Childhood in South East Europe : Historical Perspectives on Growing Up in the 19th and 20th Century
Editors: Miroslav Jovanovic & Slobodan Naumovic
paperback / softcover, Transaction Publishers
Growing interest in research on childhood can be regarded as an important factor in what has been learned about the long-term processes of change. Certainly research on childhood has radically transformed history as an academic discipline. This is especially true for historiography in South East Europe, where social history and historical anthropology is still marginal. This book presents 18 contributions; topics include the upbringing of female children in Serbia, rural childhoods in mountain regions of Austria and Greece, children and war, and children and migration. It is the first book to provide an international readership with an overall picture on childhood in southeastern Europe.

About Author
Slobodan Naumovic teaches anthropology at University of Belgrad, Serbia. Miroslav Jovanovic is a member of the Association for Social History.
864391 
Price: 44.95 USD

 
 

 

19 QuickSheet: The Historical Biographer’s Guide to Finding People in Databases & Indexes
Elizabeth Shown Mills

The premise of this QuickSheet is that while databases and indexes are valuable tools for research, they can actually impede the research process. We all know that databases and indexes can shortcut the process of discovery, and many search engines offer wildcard and Boolean options, as well as phonetic indexing systems to help researchers contend with clerical carelessness and data-entry errors. But historical records involve vagaries that defy technical formulas. Databases and indexes then become obstacles that actually block discoveries. Enter Elizabeth Mills, who in this QuickSheet shows how to adopt pro-active strategies to overcome this problem and thus get the full benefit of databases and indexes.

Confronting the problem head-on she first identifies a number of typical weaknesses--erratic spelling, family names as surnames, female name usage, penmanship, regional dialects, transcription and translation, and arbitrary selection criteria. Along with these considerations she spells out a number of specific strategies ranging from searching for given names among clusters of associates to substituting adjacent letters and numbers on a typewriter keyboard.

Three of the four laminated pages of this QuickSheet are then given over to a table of common anomalies and errors, with columnar listings of anomaly types, typical problems, and examples. Anomaly types, covering almost every erratic feature, include abbreviations, spelling issues, prefixes, handwriting, language, dialects, sorting errors, typing errors, and translated names. Corresponding columns then provide listings of typical problems, and, most helpfully, extensive examples of common problems and their likely solutions. This is a very handy feature when you hit a roadblock in your research.
8 ½" x 11", 4 pp. folded, laminated
102-3869 
Price: 9.95 USD

 

 

20 German-English Genealogical Dictionary
Ernest Thode
318 pages, Genealogical Publishing Company
This book is designed for the family researcher who has little or no knowledge of German but who nevertheless needs to make a translation of German-language documents. The dictionary covers thousands of German terms and defines them in single words or brief phrases. All words, symbols, and abbreviations in the dictionary were chosen on the basis of their association with genealogy, having been noted in church records, civil registration records, family correspondence, genealogical journals, ships' passenger lists, and emigration records. Among the many categories of entries included in the dictionary are family relationships, days of the week, map terms, legal terms, cardinal and ordinary numbers, roman numerals, signs of the zodiac, coins, liquid and dry measures, measures of length, place names, historical territories, geographical terms, occupations, titles, military ranks, types of taxes, illnesses, calendar days, male and female given names, heraldry, abbreviations, books of the Bible, and common genealogical words from Danish, Dutch, French, Latin, and Polish. In conjunction with a standard German-English dictionary, the user of this work should be able to make a word-by-word translation of any German document and understand it.
313429 
Price: 39.95 USD

 
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